What now for Qantas?

first_imgA Qantas A380. Photo: Qantas The Qantas headline loss of $2.8 billion announced today is sobering but necessary as the airline strives to clear the deck to restructure for today’s much tougher operating environment.While it is the worst result in Australian aviation history it appears that the worst is over and clearer skies are ahead for the Australian icon.And the airline is forecasting that it will return to profit in the current financial year!The good news for the staff is that there will be no new job losses above the 5,000 announced earlier this year.While many will be screaming for Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce’s head analysts appear to be supporting the airline’s strategy.Besides, anyone delivering the tough medicine that Mr Joyce has to would be extremely unpopular.Qantas has been battling many problems – mostly the result of previous management errors.Australian travellers have been deserting the airline for years.Initially it was because of cabin offerings. Malaysia Singapore Airlines and Cathay Pacific started the rot offering free drinks way back in the late 1960s. Qantas and other airlines reluctantly followed.Fast forward to the early 1990s and Singapore Airlines led the way with seatback videos for economy passengers. Emirates and Virgin Atlantic were also early adopters of entertainment for all. Inextricably, Qantas was stoic in its resistance.The airline also turned its back on premium economy with Qantas saying the airline could not “make the business case”, despite the fact that Australians are the second tallest people in the world behind the Dutch and fly the longest distances after the Kiwis.Premium economy is a no-brainer, as the airline has now discovered, just as Business Class was when Qantas was first to introduce it in 1979.In the international space Qantas faces unprecedented competition from a host of airlines such as AirAsia, Etihad Airways, Cathay Pacific Airways, Singapore Airlines and Air New Zealand which have lower costs and/or better products for passengers. For years Qantas has traded on – and charged a premium for – its superb safety record. In the movie Rain Man, Dustin Hoffman, playing Raymond Babbitt, uttered the now famous words that “Qantas never crashes”.The movie came out in 1988 at a time when Qantas was at the top of its game with well over 40 per cent of the traffic into and out of Australia.Government policy was to protect the national carrier from foreign competition; an airline which taxpayers owned and which was selling tickets at a premium to adoring travellers at a time when well-known airlines like Pan Am, Alitalia, Korean Air, and Continental Airlines were having many accidents. In 1989 there were 231 accidents and incidents, which made Qantas’ unblemished record shine.The landscape is starkly different today with most of its competitors boasting fatality free records over the past 20 years.However Qantas’ immediate clear and present danger is the emergence of rival Virgin Australia, with lower staff costs and greater productivity, into the premium domestic market, an area in which it has enjoyed a monopoly for the past 10 years.Much has been said about Qantas’s staff efficiency but the debate must also be a debate about all of Australia’s work practices and salary perks such as weekend and penalty pay rates, 17.5 per cent leave loading and such anachronistic institutions as long service leave.Many reading this would not even understand the origins of long service leave which began in South Australia and Victoria in the 1860s as a scheme that allowed civil servants three months or more leave to go home to Britain after 10 years’ service in the colonies. The lengthy time off was dictated by the long ship journey to and from Australia. Long service leave became widespread in the 1950s and no other country incorporates such a right into their labour market regulations.Holiday leave loading’s origins are just as bizarre relating to the fact that employees cannot earn overtime while they are on leave.But changing work practices and increasing efficiency will only come if Qantas can change its culture and that is a far bigger task. Charles Darwin wrote that “it is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” This idea was alluded to by former British Airways and Ansett CEO Rod Eddington when he warned in a 2004 interview with the author that achieving that responsiveness is extremely difficult.“Changing airline culture is like trying to perform an engine change in-flight,” Eddington said at the time. When Mr Eddington arrived at British Airways in 2000 he found that the staff did not perceive the need to change because the airline had a low cost airline called Go. He found that staff believed that Go mitigated or even eliminated the need for further adjustments at the mainline airline.He noted that it was difficult to change this mindset until Go was sold off to easyJet. “Once we sold Go, the staff at BA really focused on making the changes necessary to make BA itself competitive,” said Mr Eddington.Similarly with Qantas it can possibly be argued that the success of Jetstar is having a negative impact on the need for change at the mainline operation.Surveys have shown that another reason for the resistance to change is that although employees agree change is needed, they do not believe they themselves need to change.For example, at an American Airlines management conference in the late 1990s, all participants were polled on a series of questions. More than 90 per cent responded positively to the proposition that management, colleagues and subordinates needed to change, but 90 per cent responded in the negative to the item “I need to change.”Qantas like so many legacy carriers has evolved out of a military base and much of the management style, marketplace orientation and paraphernalia of culture still reflect an authoritarian, hierarchical and command-and-control worldview.Successive management teams have sidestepped taking on the more militant unions to address gross inefficiencies and ludicrous perks which dog the airline. Over the past 10 years, the launch of low cost Jetstar and a monopoly in the domestic business class market courtesy of the demise of Ansett, have masked the need for massive restructure.But that has all changed!And it now appears that Qantas is changing and that change is gaining momentum.New products will soon be rolled out, the fleet has been streamlined and over 250 separate projects are underway to cut out $2 billion from its cost base.It appears that blue skies may be returning to the flying kangaroo but the staff must get behind and support Mr Joyce.last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast November 13, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Light snow will be moving away today. We are increasing our snow potential for later this week. Overnight we saw snow fall develop, and we see a significant reduction in precipitation coverage by midday, but it will take into mid afternoon to finally see all areas of the state precipitation free. Ultimately amounts from this entire event will end up totaling a coating to an inch. That is it. In fact, the best precipitation likely is already behind us this morning. We stay dry tomorrow as well and see some decent sun before clouds start to build again.On Thursday, we are going to have to ramp up our precipitation forecast and coverage area. We had been hoping to see the low-pressure center stay south, and keep heavier precipitation at bay. Well, we are looking for liquid equivalent precipitation totals to be about the same as our forecast 24 hours ago, but the coverage is expanding greatly, and a second wave out of this system will drag some of those heavier moisture totals farther north. Snow starts near and just north of the Ohio River already Thursday morning, although there is potential for rain to mix in some with that precipitation. By early afternoon will have spread to nearly 90% of the state. Snow and a rain/snow mix will continue through the evening and overnight and should be done by Friday late morning. Liquid equivalent precipitation totals will be from a few hundredths to .5”, with the heaviest near the river where we see mostly rain. However, some of the better snows will develop over the northern half of Ohio, where we see a coating to 2 inches possible. From I-70 southward, since rain can mix in, a fresh coating is likely all the snow we see. It comes down to temperatures. The map at right shows snow potential for Thursday and Friday. We should be dry in all areas to finish out Friday afternoon. On Saturday, we are still watching a little clipper system trying to race across the corn belt near the I-80 corridor, but we are not as concerned about significant precipitation out of it. Clouds sag out of Ontario across Lake Erie and into northern Ohio. We won’t rule out a few flurries Saturday midday and afternoon from US 30 northward. However, we think precipitation is less likely for Saturday this morning than we did 24 hours ago. We still look for areas from US 30 southward see nothing. Partly to mostly sunny skies emerge for Sunday, and we stay dry Monday through Thursday of next week. Clouds may begin to increase for Thanksgiving afternoon, but we are not completely sold on any precipitation threats. We are watching thanksgiving night closely. Friday still looks mostly dry. Rains are in for the 24th through the 26th. And yes, we are talking rain. Temps will climb the second half of the week next week and will easily be warm enough for rain. Totals can be half to 2”, which will be way more than we need in any area. However, be thankful that we are talking rain, with that kind of available moisture around!!! We turn dry and colder again behind that 3-day system for the 27th and 28th.last_img read more

#TakeOverTuesday: Jason’s Pumpkin Patch, Ottawa County

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest IssuesOhio’s top conservation farmers honored IssuesLegal with Leah: The Michindoh Aquifer News RoomCultivating a Cure sets attendance, fundraising records Our OhioNine organizations receive Foundation grants IssuesOhio manufacturers, ag producers need the USMCA IssuesRural Legal Assistance on Town Hall Ohio IssuesResources available to manage farm stress StatewideOhio farmers rally to help Nebraska colleagues StatewideWhere to Find Cover Crop Beer Issues2019 State, National Priority Issueslast_img

One more holy cross desecrated

first_imgPANAJI: The desecration of religious artefacts in South Goa district continued on Friday, with another Catholic cross vandalised in Margao in the early hours of the day. A spokesperson for the Goa Police said, “The desecration of the cross occurred in the Calconda area in Margao.” This is the seventh instance of desecration of a religious artefact in South Goa in the last few weeks. Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar had earlier called the desecrations an attempt to disturb the communal harmony of the State. Goa and Daman Archbishop Filipe Neri Ferrao had urged the police to crack the cases, and called on people to maintain peace and harmony.last_img

Bonleon holds off transfer to Arellano, stays with UST for academics

first_imgChurch, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress “I won’t play, I’ll just stick to being a student,” said Bonleon, who almost had his brother Mario Emmanuel join him in Arellano, in Filipino.“The people at the alumni office will be the ones who will take care of the schooling of my brother and me.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsBonleon was adamant he will not play for UST if head coach Boy Sablan remains in charge of the team.And now that he’s back in UST, Bonleon said he still won’t suit up for the Tigers. Antetokounmpo arrives in Manila for charity stint MOST READ “I almost gave up my academics last year because I really want to play,” said Bonleon, who accused Sablan of favoritism among his players. UST’s Mario Bonleon. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netBeleaguered swingman Mario Bonleon of University of Santo Tomas held off his transfer to Arellano University after former Growling Tigers persuaded him to stay in España.In a message to INQUIRER.net, Bonleon said he will forego his status as a student-athlete but he will still enroll with UST for the 2017-2018 academic year.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more