Guardiola urges City players to be clinical

first_imgPep Guardiola was far from impressed with Manchester City’s inability to convert their chances against Tottenham Hotspur in their narrow 1-0 win.Riyad Mahrez’s early goal was the difference at Wembley Stadium as City missed clear-cut chances in both halves to increase their lead. And Guardiola bemoaned the poor finishing touches.He went on to reveal to Sky Sports: “We played today one of the most physical teams I’ve faced in my life because of Sissoko, Kane, Dier, Alderweireld, Sanchez, and Dembele. It’s incredible physicality and this pitch was so complicated. We missed some goals and we let them run.norwich city, manchester city, premier leagueReport: City are stunned by Norwich George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Manchester City was stunned by Norwich City in todays Premier League clash.Much has been made in recent days of the potential impact of Aymeric…“But we controlled quite good in terms of the difficulty to play on this pitch, especially in the first 15 to 20 minutes. In the second half, we should have the game over and that is the problem we have.“In the big events, especially in the Champions League, we need to be more clinical in this situation because sooner or later we are not going to win.”He then said in his post-match press conference: “I still feel we have a lot to improve.”last_img read more

Aubameyang geared up for the North London derby

first_imgArsenal forward Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang is expecting a “great battle” as they face Tottenham at the Emirates on Sunday.Aubameyang, who scored the winner for Arsenal on Sunday in their 2-1 win at Bournemouth last weekend, says he’s fully aware of the threat that Spurs pose, but they are ready for the challenge.Tottenham have won their last three matches in the Premier League, while Arsenal is unbeaten in 11 top-flight matches. And the two teams are preparing to lock horns in what promises to be an exciting North London derby on Sunday.“The rivalry is too much, but we know they are playing well. We know that it will be a tough game but we have to be focused on what we are doing,” Aubameyang told Sky Sports.“We know that if we want to win we need to work a lot.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“Both teams are playing well in this moment so we feel the atmosphere and the excitement. Everybody is talking about this game. It is always special to play a derby.“As an Arsenal player, we hope that only Arsenal get into the Champions League but we know it is tough and maybe both teams will go. It will be a great battle.”last_img read more

Google employees petition SF Pride to oust company from parade

first_imgOriginally published June 26. Update, June 27: Adds response from Google employees.  Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: We are honored, and humbled, by the support of all of these great activists, who have inspired us and done more for our community than we could ever hope to.And a special shout out to @CleveJones1, we are thrilled!Though @SFPride rejected our request, well keep fighting! https://t.co/7BaB49o1Ch— Ban Google From Pride (@NoPrideForGoog) June 27, 2019 6 Tags 12 Photos Google, we have some questionscenter_img Companies like Twitter, Facebook and Google have come under fire for the way they police — or don’t police– their platforms. Earlier in June, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki apologized for hurting the LGBTQ community with the decision not to take down the channel of a prominent user who had made homophobic remarks about a gay journalist. “If we took down that content, there would be so [much] other content we’d need to take down,” Wojcicki said. “We don’t want to be knee-jerk.”   In a statement, SF Pride said it wouldn’t remove Google from the parade.  “Google and YouTube can and must do more to elevate and protect the voices of LGBTQ+ creators on their platforms, and we’ve found that Google has been willing to listen to this criticism and is working to develop appropriate policies,” the statement said. The group also said Google has given benefits to same-sex partners and transgender employees, as well as participated in public advocacy for the LGBTQ community.  In response, the employees took to Twitter (via @NoPrideForGoog) to say although SF Pride rejected the request, they will keep fighting. They also said they’d racked up 129 signatures within 48 hours.  Comments Google employees have signed a petition about the company’s sponsorship of San Francisco Pride festivities.  Future Publishing/Getty Google employees don’t want Google sponsoring San Fransisco Pride festivities. In a letter and petition to the board of directors of San Fransisco Pride, posted to Medium on Wednesday, a group of Google employees said the company hasn’t improved its policies when it comes to the treatment of “LGBTQ+ persons, the depiction of LGBTQ+ persons, and harassment and hate speech directed at LGBTQ+ persons, on YouTube and other Google products.” As such, letting Google sponsor Pride would be painting the company in “a rainbow veneer of support,” the employees said in the letter. They asked the Pride board to revoke Google’s sponsorship of Pride 2019 and exclude it from the San Francisco Pride Parade on June 30. “Google has marched in the San Francisco Pride Parade for more than a decade and we are excited to continue the tradition this weekend. We are grateful for SF Pride’s partnership and leadership,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement. Google Nest Hub Max: A closer look at Google’s bigger smart display 3:19 Tech Industrylast_img read more

14m uninsured under new US health plan

first_imgUS Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) explains the Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act during his weekly press conference at the US Capitol. AFP file photoAbout 14 million fewer Americans will have health insurance next year under the new Republican plan to replace Obamacare, a nonpartisan congressional analysis projected Monday, heaping pressure on President Donald Trump to make good on his pledge for broader coverage.By 2026, that number would shoot up to 24 million, the Congressional Budget Office projected, in perhaps the most alarming revelation in its highly-anticipated report.It also said that enacting the legislation currently before Congress—a measure backed by Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan—would reduce the federal deficit by some $337 billion over the next decade, a relatively small savings given the massive size of the US economy.Average health coverage premiums would rise by 15 to 20 percent in 2018 and 2019 for individual policy holders, it said.The CBO report was being seen as a black eye for Trump’s effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, which has already faced substantial opposition from within his own party, especially over fears it would leave millions uninsured.“Trumpcare would be a nightmare for the American people,” top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer said, as he and House minority leader Nancy Pelosi urged House Speaker Paul Ryan to scrap the legislation.Trump and his inner circle have insisted the plan will be a vast improvement over Barack Obama’s signature health care reform—which many in his party say caused health care coverage costs to spike.“We disagree strenuously with the report that was put out,” Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price said at the White House.“The CBO looked at a portion of the plan but not the entire plan,” Price said.He added that the current legislation under consideration is just the first part of a three-pronged plan that includes administrative action to deregulate the marketplace and later legislation that allows people to purchase insurance across state lines.“Our plan is not about forcing people to buy expensive, one-size-fits-all coverage. It is about giving people more choices and better access to a plan they want and can afford,” Ryan said.‘Nightmare’The White House has spent the past week grappling with maintaining party unity in the face of opposition to the new initiative.Some conservatives have argued that the plan is too similar to Obamacare, while moderates warn the new legislation does not provide enough funding to help millions retain or purchase coverage.Trump campaigned for a full year on repealing and replacing Obamacare, repeatedly stating his desire to make health coverage available for everybody.On Sunday, his administration went so far as to predict no one will suffer financially from the transition to a more free-market system.“Nobody will be worse off financially in the process that we’re going through,” Price said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”Trump, facing mounting concern about the plan, met Monday with “victims of Obamacare” to highlight the Republican replacement.Asked before the CBO report was released whether he had a message to Americans who might lose coverage, Trump urged optimism.“If we’re allowed to do what we want to do, it will get better. Much better,” he replied.‘Do not walk the plank’The GOP plan rolls back the expansion of the Medicaid health care program for the poor by 2020, replaces government subsidies with tax credits to help individuals buy insurance and scraps Obamacare taxes.It preserves two popular Obamacare provisions: the rules that insurance companies cannot refuse coverage to anyone due to a pre-existing condition, and that dependents can remain on their parents’ insurance plan until age 26.The Affordable Care Act helped 20 million Americans gain coverage.Under the new plan, premiums would begin decreasing by 2020, CBO said, due to grants that could bump up tax credits to poor or working-class Americans, and because younger people would be projected to sign up for coverage.But costs by 2026 would be some 20 to 25 percent higher for people age 55 to 64, CBO said.And by that year, roughly 19 percent of Americans under 65 would be uninsured, CBO said, compared with the 10 percent uninsured projected under current law.Senator Tom Cotton warned that the bill as is could not pass the Senate, and called on fellow Republicans to avoid a political meltdown on health care that could cost their party in the 2018 mid-term elections.“I would say to my friends in the House of Representatives, with whom I served: Do not walk the plank and vote for a bill that cannot pass the Senate and then have to face the consequences of that vote,” Cotton told ABC “This Week.”last_img read more

CU teacher Maidul remanded for derogatory remarks on PM Hasina

first_imgMaidul Islam. Photo: UNBA Chattogram court on Monday placed Maidul Islam, an assistant professor of Chittagong University (CU), on a three-day remand in a case filed for making ‘derogatory remarks’ on prime minister Sheikh Hasina on Facebook.Chattogram senior judicial magistrate Shahidullah Kaiser passed the order following a remand petition filed by police.On Sunday, police sought a five-day remand for Maidul in the case.On 24 September, Maidul Islam was sent to jail in the case filed by former leader of Bangladesh Chhatra League and CU student Md Iftekhar Uddin Ayaz with Hathazari police station under the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Act on 24 July.CU authorities suspended Maidul Islam on 25 September in this connection.On 15 July, the Sociology teacher had to leave the campus along with his family following continuous threat reportedly from BCL activists over his Facebook post in support of the quota reform movement.The BCL men also declared Maidul Islam and another CU teacher persona non-grata on the campus.last_img read more

India job crisis drives migrants on boat to NZ

first_imgA man looks on from a building at a residential area from where several people travelled illegally on a boat to New Zealand, in New Delhi, India, 23 January 2019. Photo: ReutersIn a dark alleyway no wider than arms’ length, a single ladies’ shoe is all that remains on the boarded-up doorstep of Prabhu Dhandapani, his wife and their eight-year-old daughter.Prabhu, 30, was one of around 50 residents of a refugee community in New Delhi who left the capital to attempt a 7,000-mile boat journey through some of the roughest waters in the world with the aim of landing illegally in New Zealand, relatives and police said.He is now in custody in southern India, while his wife and daughter are missing, along with everyone else who boarded the fishing boat that police say left Munambam harbour in Kerala on 12 January carrying more than 100 people.The most likely and shortest route, though the straits between Indonesia and Australia, passes through seas where storms and typhoons are common.More than a dozen relatives of passengers on board the boat, that include pregnant women and young children, told Reuters they left to escape chronic unemployment in the Madangir area on the south side of New Delhi.“They had to leave to find jobs, to eat,” said Prabhu’s mother, Sugana. “They have been promised work in New Zealand.”When asked if she knew where the country was, she shook her head.It is the first known attempt by migrants to reach New Zealand by boat from India, and their story is a reminder of the vast challenge the country faces to create jobs for the 1 million young people who enter its workforce every month.Boats have been setting out from South and Southeast Asia for Australia for a number of years but Indians making the trip have been relatively rare, based on Australian government statistics that show the largest numbers detained there to be asylum seekers from Iran and Afghanistan.Long JourneyPassengers from Delhi left the capital in stages in December and early January. They checked into guesthouses near Munambam, a busy fishing port.They appear to have boarded the boat willingly, said a senior police official in Delhi briefed on the investigation. Their local police station in the capital had not received any missing persons’ reports.Precise numbers on the boat – and who organised it – are unknown. One officer from Kerala investigating the case said around 100 people were on board. A second said it could be more than 200, with the remaining passengers coming from the south Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Police recovered more than 70 bags left behind by the migrants, said one of the officers, VG Ravindran.“The bags are full of dry goods and clothes, suggesting they were preparing for a long journey,” MJ Sojan, the officer leading the investigation told Reuters. “The people and boat are missing somewhere in the sea.”Some passengers, including Prabhu, did not board the boat, and police traced several back to Madangir after finding identification documents in the bags left behind. He was detained by Kerala police less than 10 minutes after arriving back in Delhi, his mother said, and taken back to the state for questioning.Sugana said she did not know why Prabhu did not board the boat with his wife, Anandi, and eight-year-old daughter Trisha. She said he was not involved in people smuggling.Hard LifeMany of the older residents of the Tamil community in Madangir fled Sri Lanka in 1983, when a civil war erupted between the majority Sinhalese Buddhist population and the minority Tamils, an ethnic group predominantly living in south India and north and east Sri Lanka.They settled in the area, a few miles from India’s parliament building and some of the country’s most expensive real estate, but which has suffered from rampant unemployment, residents said.“If we get the chance we will also go: this is a rotten place,” said Kanaga Lingam, a Sri Lankan refugee whose son, K Raghu, boarded the boat with his wife and two sons.There is anger too at prime minister Narendra Modi, who came to power in 2014 promising to create millions of new jobs for India’s young and rapidly expanding workforce.In fact, the country lost as many as 11 million jobs last year, according to a report by the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE) think-tank, putting Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) under pressure before a general election due by May.While the official jobless rate is only 3.5 per cent, the last comprehensive labour bureau survey was in 2015-16, and many unofficial estimates say it is much higher, especially if the underemployed, who only work for a few months a year or a few days a week, are counted.Many of those in the Tamil enclave who do work do so as daily manual labourers, a poorly-paid and unstable living.“If I am able I will go to Modi’s house and beg at his feet to be allowed to go to another country,” said a woman called Bumi, who like many southern Indians goes by only one name.“There are a hundred problems here. We have no jobs,” said a 32-year-old man, who like many in the area declined to be named, fearing involvement in the police investigation into the boat.Crime is also an issue in the area, primarily theft, the Delhi police official said.The BJP disputes the CMIE figures on unemployment. On Thursday several cabinet minister pointed to alternative figures from Naukri, an online jobs portal, showing a pick-up in employment over the last year.Land of promiseMany of those Reuters spoke to in the community, centered around a rubble- and garbage-strewn courtyard and several densely populated alleyways, said those on board the boat had been inspired by stories of Indian migrants starting new lives abroad, particularly in Australia.More than 600,000 Indians live in Australia, according to the latest government census, the vast majority of whom arrived legally. There are 155,000 in New Zealand.“People who go to Australia get put in camps for three months,” Kanaga said. “After that they get given proper housing. Everything is taken care of.”But few of those on the boat had passports, according to several people with relatives on board, and the reality for those arriving illegally is very different.If the boat lands in Australia or is intercepted by its border force on the way to New Zealand, those on board face being sent back to India, or to controversial camps in the South Pacific for long-term detention.“If they don’t have visas they would be unlawful maritime arrivals and as such they would be prevented from making an application for a further visa,” said Melbourne-based migration lawyer David Harvey. “They would likely be diverted to an offshore processing center.”New Zealand has seen fewer arrivals than Australia, although it now is also trying to warn off illegal migrants arriving by boat.“Any attempt to reach New Zealand will put your life, and the lives of your family members, at great risk,” said Stephen Vaughan, assistant general manager of the country’s immigration department. “There is every chance you will drown at sea.”But in Madangir, residents say the warnings will do little to deter such journeys.“We know about the dangers,” Kanaga said. “But it is more dangerous to live here than it is to go.”last_img read more

Houston United Methodists React To Denominations Decision To Bar LGBTQ Clergy

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sid Hastings/APProtestors chant during the United Methodist Church’s special session of the general conference in St. Louis, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019. X Two Houston pastors interviewed by Houston Matters on Friday weighed in on the decision by the General Conference of the United Methodist Church to define marriage as the union of a man and a woman, and to add more punitive accountability measures regarding officiating same sex marriages. Additionally, LGBTQ+ individuals are still ineligible for ordination.The decision was reached at the meeting held in St. Louis this week by the church’s General Conference. After several hours of debate, the conservatives’ proposal, called the Traditional Plan, was approved by a vote of 438-384.John Stephens, senior pastor at Houston’s Chapelwood United Methodist Church, told Houston Matters that his congregation is very diverse and that when the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same sex marriage in 2015 the dialogue changed within the church.Stephens, who describes himself as a “centrist,” said he could accept that pastors officiate same sex weddings and he finds that the decision by the General Conference has hurt LGBTQ+ individuals. “What they hear in this is that: ‘I’m not loved, I can’t be a part of this church’,” he noted.Some members of the United Methodist church say that embracing practices that are friendly towards LGBTQ+ individuals would be allowing sin in the church, according to Stephens, who thinks the issue of homosexuality “is right at the forefront of our cultural angst.”“We live in a country where same sex marriage is legal. Now, as a church, we can build our walls higher and say who we want to let in or want to let out or not go out into the world and be in ministry. I just don’t, I fundamentally don’t agree with that. I don’t think that’s missional,” Stephens added.In a post published on his blog, the pastor said he thinks the conversation about changing the Methodist church to accept LGBTQ+ individuals will continue.Rev. Hannah Terry, of Westbury United Methodist Church and St. Mark’s Methodist Church, told Houston Matters Host Craig Cohen that people are “anxious” and feel hurt by the decision. She emphasized that she supports people in the church that are LGBTQ+ “all the way.”Terry said the Westbury congregation has a history of including all people, going back to the civil rights era when the congregation welcomed African American families into the church. “The general conference does not change that,” she said.“I am really concerned about the LGBTQ community,” Terry said, and added she is particularly concerned about “clergy that are queer and lay members that are queer.”After the meeting of the General Conference, Kenneth H. Carter, president of the Council of Bishops, said he is concerned the plan approved this week will cause progressive churches to leave the denomination.Asked about a potential formal split in Houston congregations from the denomination and the General Conference, Terry responded: “I don’t know.”With nearly 7 million members, the United Methodist church is the second largest Protestant denomination in the United States.center_img Listen 00:00 /09:14 Sharelast_img read more

Guj HC Bench recuses from petition against Reliance SEZ

first_imghmedabad: A division Bench of the Gujarat High Court, headed by acting Chief Justice VM Sahai, has recused itself from hearing a petition against acquisition of land for a special economic zone (SEZ) in five villages in Jamnagar district for Reliance Project Engineering Associates. “List these matters before a Bench, of which both of us are not members after obtaining nomination from the Honourable acting Chief Justice on the administrative side,” the Bench of Justices Sahai and RP Dholaria  Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJIhad said on June 22.Before passing the order, Justice Sahai said: “We can’t take up the case….whatever has happened in the last two-three days has shaken our confidence.” However, he did not elaborate further on the reasons. Local villagers, who have moved the HC, have alleged that land acquisition rules were violated while granting land to the Reliance group.According to the petition, on November 21, 2005, the Union government sanctioned SEZ for petroleum and petro products for Reliance Project Engineering Associates by “violating” all the norms under SEZ Act. Subsequently, 4,494 hectares of land in Navagam, Kanalus, Kanachhikari, Padana and Derachhikari were acquired by Reliance Industries Ltd in 2008, it says.last_img read more