Child and Youth Advocate to review Inuit child welfare in Newfoundland and

first_imgJustin Brake APTN NewsNewfoundland and Labrador’s Child and Youth Advocate has announced that her office will undertake a “comprehensive, independent review of the treatment, experiences and outcomes of Inuit children and youth” in the province’s child protection system.“I am extremely troubled about the poor outcomes for Indigenous children in the child protection system,” Jackie Lake Kavanagh said in a press release Wednesday. “This is a historical issue with its roots in colonial practices reflected in residential schools, generations of families with histories of trauma, and social inequality. The status quo is not acceptable and cannot continue for Inuit children and youth.”The announcement comes almost 10 months after the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador announced a provincial inquiry into Innu children in state care.Days prior to that announcement Innu leaders from Labrador confronted former Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett at a Canada Day barbecue in her Toronto riding and demanded federal intervention in what many have described as a suicide and child welfare crisis.Michelle Kinney, Nunatsiavut Government’s Director of Social Development and Deputy Minister of Health and Social Development told APTN Wednesday’s announcement is the result of collaboration between the provincial government and the self-governing political body that represents the Inuit communities of Northern Labrador.“We wanted a process where we could review the systemic issues, involve people in our communities so that they were part of the process, and come up with solutions and ways of implementing them,” she said.“We thought that if we can get this process right that it would be a good model for reconciliation for the province, for the feds, for the future projects that we might work on.”Kinney said approximately 145 of the roughly 1,000 children in state care in Newfoundland and Labrador are Inuit. Many of them have been taken away from their extended families, communities, and even placed in foster homes outside of Labrador.She said Nunatsiavut’s 2005 land claims agreement gives Inuit the ability to “take down or devolve any provincial program when they are ready and have the capacity to do so, and can meet or exceed provincial standards.”In the meantime Kinney said the Inuit have been gradually identifying and implementing some of their own solutions, but that a successful and all-encompassing process requires the kind of review being undertaken by the Child and Youth Advocate’s office.“If we’re looking at a devolution process we really need to have good documentation, good evidence, look at what hasn’t worked in the past, and have a really good model and plan for moving forward. So we’re hoping this review will give us some of that,” she explained.“The biggest issue we see is that the child welfare system has become reactive, Kinney continued. “We would like to see resources put into preventing children from coming into care.“We all know the systemic issues. We all know why some parents are not doing well: residential schools, relocation, colonization. All of those things haven’t been favourable to Indigenous people.”She said the “majority of our children are coming into care for neglect, poverty, parents’ issues with alcohol, and witnessing family violence,” and that “very few children are actually coming into care because of maltreatment or physical or sexual abuse.”The terms of reference mandate directs Kavanagh to “review child protection services provided to Inuit children” in the province “with a view to identifying deficiencies, exploring promising and best practices, and making recommendations for improved outcomes within an appropriate cultural framework.”The review is scheduled to conclude by March 31, 2019 and a public report with the review’s findings will be released thereafter.APTN requested comment from Children, Seniors and Social Development Minister Lisa Dempster but did not receive a response by the time of publication.last_img read more

Waiting periods reduce deaths from guns study suggests

first_img Citation: Waiting periods reduce deaths from guns, study suggests (2017, October 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-10-periods-deaths-guns.html Explore further (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with Harvard Business School has found evidence that they claim shows gun deaths decline when states enact waiting period laws. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Michael Luca, Deepak Malhotra and Christopher Poliquin describe their study and discuss their results. More information: Michael Luca et al. Handgun waiting periods reduce gun deaths, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1619896114AbstractHandgun waiting periods are laws that impose a delay between the initiation of a purchase and final acquisition of a firearm. We show that waiting periods, which create a “cooling off” period among buyers, significantly reduce the incidence of gun violence. We estimate the impact of waiting periods on gun deaths, exploiting all changes to state-level policies in the Unites States since 1970. We find that waiting periods reduce gun homicides by roughly 17%. We provide further support for the causal impact of waiting periods on homicides by exploiting a natural experiment resulting from a federal law in 1994 that imposed a temporary waiting period on a subset of states. Gun laws requiring domestic abusers to surrender firearms could save lives There is no debate regarding the numbers of people that are killed each year in the United States from bullet wounds—good records exist. The average is now up to 33,000 each year. What remains up for debate is what to do about it. Some individuals and groups have proposed enacting laws restricting gun sales, while others vehemently object to any such restrictions, citing their right to bear arms as spelled out in the Constitution. Somewhere in the middle, there are possible ways to reduce gun violence by enacting less restrictive laws. One such approach is to mandate that anyone buying a gun must wait a specified number of days after the purchase before taking possession of it. The idea is that a waiting period reduces murders and suicides because it gives those gun buyers time to cool off and think a little bit more about their plans before obtaining a gun. Unfortunately, evidence of whether this actually happens has been scant because the U.S. government has enacted laws disallowing the government from funding studies seeking answers to such questions. In this new effort, the researchers circumvented that problem by asking for and receiving funding directly through their own institution.The study consisted of two parts: The first looked at differences in gun death rates between states that had waiting periods and those that did not over the period between 1970 and 2014. The second part consisted of looking at changes in gun death rates in states that enacted waiting periods after passage of the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act in 1994, which essentially forced all states to enact waiting periods.Results from the first part of the study showed on average 17 percent fewer gun-related deaths for states with a waiting period (and approximately 10 percent fewer gun-related suicides). Results from the second part of the study nearly mirrored the first—the trio found that gun-related homicide deaths following passage of the Brady Bill dropped on average 17 percent while gun-related suicides dropped approximately 6 percent.The researchers suggest their findings indicate that if the U.S. were to implement a nationwide waiting period for gun purchases, the country as a whole could reduce annual gun deaths by approximately 1,700 a year.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences © 2017 Phys.org Credit: CC0 Public Domain This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Childhood head injury may up mental illness mortality risk

first_imgThe findings showed that people who had experienced a single mild, moderate or severe brain injury during childhood were at twice the risk of being admitted to hospital as a mental health inpatient (an increase in absolute risk from 5 per cent to 10 per cent).They were 50 per cent more likely to use a mental health service (increase from 14 per cent to 20 per cent) than unaffected people in the same age group.The risk of outcomes, including the likelihood of developing a psychiatric illness, became higher if the injury was more severe, or if there were multiple injuries. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf“The study found that a childhood brain injury increased the chances of all these things. More serious brain injuries and repeated brain injuries made them even more likely,” said lead author Seena Fazel, professor at Oxford University.Further, they were 80 per cent more likely to receive disability benefits (increase from 4 per cent to 6 per cent) and 70 per cent more likely to die before the age of 41 (increase from 0.8 per cent to 1.6 per cent).  Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsivePeople who had experienced repeated mild, moderate or severe brain injury were over two-and-a-half times more likely to receive disability benefits than contemporaries who had experienced a single-episode injury (increase from 6 per cent to 12 per cent).In addition, there were also 60 per cent more likely to have done poorly at school (increase from 9 per cent to 14 per cent) or be in receipt of welfare benefits (increase from 12 per cent to 19 per cent). “Our study indicates far-reaching and long-term consequences of head injury. It reinforces what we knew already — that prevention is key,” Fazel said. “Existing work to prevent head injuries to young people in sports, for example, needs to be enhanced. Long-term follow up could identify negative effects so that early intervention can prevent a drift into low attainment, unemployment and mental illness,” Fazel suggested in the paper published in the journal PLOS Medicine.For the study, the international team of researchers, analysed data from more than a million Swedes born between 1973 and 1985 to examine the long-term impact of having a traumatic brain injury before the age of 25.The study looked at low educational attainment, instances of psychiatric care, receiving welfare and disability benefit and early death in the participants.The team compared people who had experienced brain injury to unaffected people in their same age group, and also to their brothers and sisters who had not been injured.last_img read more

Antidengue drive gains strength at vulnerable wards

first_imgKolkata: In view of monsoon the Kolkata Municipal Corporation has intensified its anti-dengue drive.A drive was carried out in ward No. 109 in Jadavpur. Besides senior officials of Kolkata Municipal Corporation’s health department, officials of the Sewage and Drainage, Park and Square, Building, Solid Waste management departments were present in the drive. The KMC officials are cleaning the water bodies that have not been touched for decades. The water serves as the mosquito breeding ground. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe Kolkata Municipal Corporation has identified 20 vulnerable wards like 1,6,14,36,79,82,81,107,108,109, 131 and 132 among others. Special drives are being carried on the roads where Dengue cases had been detected in 2018. Senior civic officials said so far no Dengue cases had been reported from these areas in 2019. The Kolkata Municipal Corporation had started anti Dengue drive in February. The drives have been divided into three phases. The first phase that started in February will continue till June. The second phase will start from July and end in October. The third phase will be conducted in November and December. A round up phase will be conducted in January and February 2020. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateThe Kolkata Municipal Corporation had launched a massive awareness campaign in January when 144 rallies were held throughout the city. The main rally was held at Kolkata Municipal Corporation headquarters. It was led by the Mayor Firhad Hakim. People from all walks of life took part in the rally. Senior civic officials said to combat dengue, public awareness is urgently required. They said that people have been asked to clean the containers which are used to store water at least once in a week. But in many cases the house owners refuse to do so. In many buildings the covers of overhead tanks and underground reservoirs are not in proper place. The house owners also do not clean the water of flower vase once a week. The Kolkata Municipal Corporation teams are visiting the houses and inspecting the overhead tanks and under ground reservoirs and whether the garbage has been cleaned regularly or not. The teams are also visiting the offices, hospitals and housing complexes managed by the state and central governments.last_img read more

CATO to host May 1 info session on changes to the Ontario

first_img Posted by CATO to host May 1 info session on changes to the Ontario Travel Act Travelweek Group Thursday, April 19, 2018 TORONTO — The Canadian Association of Tour Operators is hosting a presentation by TICO President and CEO Richard Smart and all Canadian tour operators are invited to attend.CATO Executive Director Pierre LePage says Smart will give an update on the recent changes followed by an open forum and Q&A session with attendees, providing insight into the impact of the changes on all tour operators.The presentation will take place from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 1 at the TICO Board Room, (Travel Industry Council of Ontario), 2700 Matheson Blvd East, Suite 402, West Tower in Mississauga.Both the presentation and open forum are open to all tour operators, both CATO members and non-members, says LePage.Tour operators wishing to attend should email LePage at plepage@cato.ca indicating who will be attending and their company name. Tags: TICO << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more