Accurately Counting NBA Tattoos Isnt Easy Even If Youre Up Close

Ethan Swan’s database of NBA players’ tattoos is the most complete such record I’m aware of, but it’s not the only one. (Swan, whom I wrote about Friday, gave us permission to publish his data on GitHub; you can see it here.)The Sports Geeks have collected some information, but their page on NBA tattoos is out of date; many players currently in the league aren’t listed. The Tumblr Basketball Player Tattoos aggregates photos — including some really striking ones — but it hasn’t been updated in almost a year. (Let me know if you’ve seen other data sets.)Harvey Pollack, the 92-year-old director of statistical information for the Philadelphia 76ers, produces the only list I’ve seen that approaches the completeness of Swan’s. (My colleague Carl Bialik, who conducted the data analysis in the Swan piece, profiled Pollack last month.) Each year, Pollack dedicates a page of the Sixers’ printed statistical guide to tattoo data. The only one I could find that he put online was from 2010, the year before Swan got started.Unlike Swan, who simply Googles “NBA tattoo” and follows players on Twitter, Pollack and his staff get their information firsthand. They log the tattoos they see on visiting players and quiz team trainers about body art that may lurk beneath the players’ uniforms.But looking guys over as they dribble by doesn’t seem to be as effective as Googling. Swan counted 230 tattooed players in 2010-11, while Pollack found 198. The next year, they both came up with 237. Last year, Swan’s total was 250 and Pollack’s was just 157. (Pollack hasn’t released his total for this year.)So whom, specifically, did Pollack miss in 2012-13? Let’s take the Atlanta Hawks as an example. He counted tattoos on six Hawks but missed them on five others — John Jenkins, Shelvin Mack, Johan Petro, Mike Scott and Louis Williams. The design on Jenkins’s chest may have been hard to see through his jersey, but it should have been easy to see the tattoo on Mack’s arm — especially since he briefly played for the Sixers that season. read more

Keyshawn Johnson Offers Advice To Santonio Holmes

Sixteen years ago, Keyshawn Johnson was the No. 1 pick of the NFL Draft, landing in New York with the Jets. He was young and brash and before he was done he penned a book called, “Just Throw Me The Damn Ball.”To say Johnson was mouthy would be an understatement. So it was ironic – and pretty cool, too – that a much more mature Johnson spent some of the Jets’ first  day of training camp to lend advice to the Jets’ current mouthy receive, Santonio Holmes.“It was a big brother-to-little brother talk,” Holmes said. “He was just teaching me to be cordial to everybody and to understand what gift I have to this football team and learning how to utilize it.”Johnson, at Jets camp working for ESPN, figured he catch Holme’s ear because the receiver lately has been spewing nothing but venom. Since the last game of disappointing last season, when he did not catch a pass and was benched, Holmes has blasted quarterback Mark Sanchez, questioned the two-quarterback system of Sanchez and Tim Tebow and generally been Mr. Grinch.Immaturity is what Johnson attributed to Holmes’ penchant to taking on anyone in his path.“All eyes are you,” said Johnson, relating what he told Holmes. “If you can do it — and you’ve done it before — you can write your ticket.”Holmes was a lightening rod and disruption last year, criticizing Sanchez and the offensive line, making a bad season worse. Johnson was not acting as if he were Dr. Phil, but he did seem to believe Holmes will comport himself differently this year.“He’ll grow up,” Johnson said. “He’ll get there. I’m not worried.”Already, Holmes contends and Sanchez have become close and are looking forward to a big season.“That was last year, man,” Holmes said. “Let’s move on.” read more

Podcast The NFL Draft Mayweathers Past And How Many NFL Players Go

Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Welcome to this week’s episode of Hot Takedown, our podcast where the hot sports takes of the week meet the numbers that prove them right or tear them down. On this week’s show (for April 28, 2015), we look at the upcoming NFL draft and whether there is anything to all the measuring and testing that goes into evaluating prospects; Floyd Mayweather Jr. vs. Manny Pacquiao, the future of boxing, and Mayweather’s violent past; and ESPN’s Pablo Torre visits the studio to discuss a new study on how many NFL athletes go bankrupt. And our significant digit this week is -14.7 — how many points the Toronto Raptors underperformed by this offseason.Plus: An update on the first Hot Takedown crowdsourcing project, which asks you to submit your ideas to help stop tanking in the NBA.Stream the episode by clicking the play button above, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to.Below, some links to what we discuss in this week’s show:How would you fix the NBA draft and stop tanking? Tell us.Neil Paine on how NFL teams try to beat the draft — and fail.How surplus value works in the NFL Draft.What does the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight mean for the future of boxing?“Outside The Lines” on Mayweather’s troubled past.A look at whether we missed out on the best possible fight between these two boxers.Pablo Torre’s 2009 article “How (and Why) Athletes Go Broke.”The recent NBER paper on NFL bankruptcy. Hot Takedown If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

Good News Browns Your Chances Of Making The Playoffs Are 1 In

Jacksonville beats Indianapolis75–0.00144523 Minnesota beats Cincinnati77–0.00000000 Kansas City beats Denver66–0.00000000 12New England beats Miami90%–90.00000000% Cleveland beats Cincinnati16–0.72442626 Cincinnati beats Baltimore32–0.00000000 For a brief moment there on Sunday, the Cleveland Browns’ 2017 season appeared to be lost. The team was defeated by the Jacksonville Jaguars, moving its record to 0-10. Considering that no team has ever made the NFL playoffs with 10 losses, the result seemed to dash any remaining hope in Cleveland that the Browns would make a run.Or did it?It turns out, thanks to the assiduous investigations of a Redditor who goes by MrMolonLabe, the Browns are still in this thing: Provided that 46 different games go their way — including two ties — a hypothetical 6-10 Cleveland Browns can be the second AFC wild card team.It’s all rather simple. First, Cleveland wins out — that’s the easy part.1Minor note: The chance that the easy part actually happens is roughly 1 in 650 based on our projections for the rest of the Browns season. Then the Browns need the following: Week 12 wins from Kansas City, Tennessee, New England, Houston, Dallas and Carolina; Week 13 wins from New England, Denver, Jacksonville, Kansas City, Tennessee, Pittsburgh, Detroit and the Giants; Week 14 wins from Indianapolis, the Jets, Kansas City, New England, Chicago, Washington and San Francisco; Week 15 wins from Denver, Kansas City, Miami, Jacksonville, New Orleans, Minnesota and Dallas; Week 16 wins for Baltimore, Kansas City, San Diego, New England, Pittsburgh and Washington; and Week 17 wins for Kansas City, Indianapolis, New England and Cincinnati. Also, the Broncos and Raiders need to tie in Week 12, and the Bills and Dolphins need to tie in Week 17.If all this happens, there would be four AFC teams with a record of 5-10-1 and five more at 5-11. The Patriots, Steelers, Chiefs and Titans would win their respective divisions, and the Jaguars would get the first wild card at 12-4. That leaves the Ravens and Browns tied for the last spot at 6-10. The Browns would win the tiebreaker because their Week 15 win over Baltimore would split the season series, and Cleveland would have a better record in the division.Luckily, we happen to have forecasts for each of those games and can assign a probability for each of those discrete events based on each team’s current Elo rating.2The big assumption here is that the events are independent. Here’s how it shakes out: Pittsburgh beats Cincinnati66–0.00095385 Wash. beats L.A. Chargers39–0.00000036 Kansas City beats Oakland77–0.00000218 15New Orleans beats N.Y. Jets82–0.00000000 Kansas City beats N.Y. Jets64–0.00061047 Pittsburgh beats Houston67–0.00000000 Denver-Oakland tie*0.35–0.00253549 N.Y. Giants beats Oakland32–0.00002492 Some are trickier than others: Elo can’t tell us the probability that a given NFL game will end in a tie because most NFL games do not end in ties. For that, we’ll need a better estimate: There have been 5 ties since 2012 over 1,440 games played,3They changed the playoff rules again this year, which should make ties easier, but we haven’t had one since the change so we don’t have a good number for that. Regardless, this estimate is higher than the overall historical probability of ties. giving us a back-of-the-napkin probability of a specific game going to a tie as 0.35 percent, a rate of about 1 tie every 288 games.Let’s set aside Cleveland’s two needed ties for a moment. Multiplying the Elo probability that each game breaks the Browns’ way, we anticipate there is a 1 in 238,559,677,617,755 chance that they will get that sixth wild card slot. The probability of having two specific selected games tie is a 1 in 82,369 chance. Combining those two chances, we anticipate that the Cleveland Browns have a 1 in 19,649,922,085,696,900,000 — that is 19.6 quintillion — chance of making the playoffs.More to the point, the Browns have a probability of 32 percent to go 0-16 this year. But hey, anything is possible.Check out our latest NFL predictions. Indianapolis beats Houston52–0.00000000 Detroit beats Baltimore45–0.00007788 Kansas City beats Miami83–0.00000000 Cleveland beats L.A. Chargers14–0.00000349 14New England beats Miami81–0.00000283 13New England beats Buffalo76–0.00192697 16New England beats Buffalo87–0.00000000 Tennessee beats Houston63–0.00038459 K.C. beats L.A. Chargers76–0.00000000 Houston beats Baltimore32–4.52766413 San Francisco beats Houston21–0.00000000 Jacksonville beats Houston69–0.00000000 WEEKOUTCOMEPROBABILITYCUM. PROBABILITY Miami beats Buffalo34–0.00000000 N.Y. Jets beats Denver42–0.00000091 Buffalo-Miami tie0.35–0.00000000 Dallas beats Oakland52–0.00000000 Denver beats Indianapolis45–0.00000000 17New England beats N.Y. Jets88–0.00000000 Denver beats Miami45–0.00017307 Tennessee beats Indianapolis52–14.14895040 Kansas City beats Buffalo78–70.20000000 Indianapolis beats Buffalo34–0.00000012 Cleveland beats Green Bay25–0.00000001 Wash. beats Denver64–0.00000000 Baltimore beats Indianapolis74–0.00000000 Cleveland beats Chicago22–0.00000000 Chicago beats Cincinnati31–0.00000004 Cleveland beats Baltimore21–0.00000000 L.A. Chargers beats N.Y. Jets46–0.00000000 Dallas beats L.A. Chargers68–47.73600000 Cleveland beats Pittsburgh6–0.00000000 * Since 2012, 0.35 percent of games ended in a tie Total1 in 19,649,922,085,696,900,000 Carolina beats N.Y. Jets57–27.20952000 So you’re saying there’s a chance…What the Browns need to happen to make the playoffs this year read more

Buckeyes snap 3game skid with rout of BethuneCookman

After enduring a rare three-game losing streak, the Ohio State women’s basketball team (9-4, 0-1) got a shot of confidence Sunday, when it defeated Bethune-Cookman (6-6), 86-38. “I think there’s a concerted effort that we understand how hard we have to play. It’s something that this group has had difficulty comprehending,” said OSU coach Jim Foster. “If you play hard every day, things get taken care of.” After falling behind the Daytona Beach, Fla., team 4-0 early in the game, OSU senior center Jantel Lavender took the game into her own hands, scoring the first 11 points for the Buckeyes, and 15 of their first 19 points as OSU jumped out to a 46-25 first-half lead. Lavender, who entered the game as the nation’s third-leading scorer, finished with 29 points in 21 minutes of action. “We have to take this game and just try to emulate what we need to do in the Big Ten games,” Lavender said. “It was just a good game to just get that feeling back and just refresh ourselves and know that we have confidence.” OSU junior guard Samantha Prahalis bounced back from her 1-for-13 shooting performance against Michigan, scoring 10 points and making 10 assists in her first double-double performance since OSU’s Dec. 5 win over Oklahoma. Prahalis provided the customary dazzling passes and flashy ball handling that had been absent from her game throughout much of the Buckeyes’ three-game skid. Prahalis said that her success on the offensive end of the court started on defense. “We played pretty good defense and rebounded. We just got the ball out,” Prahalis said. “We were just in a flow, in a good rhythm, and we just pushed it.” For the game, OSU held a 31-2 advantage in fast-break points against the Wildcats. Foster said the difference between OSU’s win and its previous three losses was the Buckeyes’ ability to get score on fast breaks. “Sammy and Jantel, they see each other,” Foster said. “We can get in transition because we’re playing such good defense, and we can get in transition, and Jantel can run. We haven’t been getting that — we haven’t been getting those easy baskets in transition.” After dropping their conference opener to Michigan, the Buckeyes find themselves in the unfamiliar position of looking up in the Big Ten standings and will continue to rely on the play of the tandem of Lavender and Prahalis as they enter the remainder of conference play. OSU returns to conference play Wednesday when it hosts Indiana in its Big Ten home opener. Despite the Buckeyes’ 0-1 start in conference play, Foster said that his team is still the team to beat in the Big Ten. “Everybody in this league still wants a piece of us, and rightfully so,” Foster said. “We’ve earned the right for them to want a piece of us, but now you got to back it up.” read more

Commentary A gift wrapped pass to the NFL for Terrelle Pryor

Ohio State has gift wrapped Terrelle Pryor’s going-away present in the form of a punishment. In the last couple of days Pryor’s journey to the NFL has hit a couple of speed bumps, with his eligibility to a supplemental draft coming into question. The letter of the rule states that a player may only enter a supplemental draft if their situation changes and they are not able to participate in the next season. Technically, between the deadline to declare for the draft in January and when Pryor left the university on June 8, his situation had not changed. Technically. When the draft deadline came, Pryor was suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season. At that time the “tat-5” scandal seemed to be under control. Everything was (relatively) normal. The Buckeyes had won the Sugar Bowl The Sugar Bowl was sucked into the black hole of the sporting world. And compliance problems with head coach Jim Tressel were non-existent. Pryor had a contract with the coach to remain on the Buckeye squad for the 2011 season in exchange to play in the Sugar Bowl for nothing. While inevitably Pryor still had his doubts about the season, he still had Tressel to fall back on. One thing that is clearly evident from the transcript of Tressel’s interview from the NCAA, it’s that Pryor and Tressel were very close. Pryor depended on the coach for more than just football related issues. When all hell broke loose on March 8, Tressel received a two-game suspension from the university. A suspension that a short time later was increased to a five-game suspension. After more and more of the scandal developed, it became clear that the season was not going to be what everyone had thought it was going to be. Then on May 30, Tressel resigned (read: retired) from the university. I think it’s safe to say Pryor’s situation had changed. Seemingly following Tressel step for step, Pryor was gone a week later to pursue an NFL career. He had planned to enter a supplemental draft. The rules for a supplemental draft changed after Cleveland Browns quarterback Bernie Kosar used the supplemental draft to avoid being drafted by the Minnesota Vikings. He was drafted by Cleveland in the supplemental, and since then, the rules for supplemental draft eligibility have tightened. The rule lists three reasons to let someone enter a supplemental draft: flunking out of school, graduating and deciding to leave and being kicked off the team. As of earlier today, Pryor did not meet any of these requirements, technically. Cleverly disguised as a punishment, the university did the best thing for Pryor to help him pursue his NFL dream. They sent him a letter on Tuesday banning him from all athletic facilities for five years, and declared him ineligible from intercollegiate play. The letter states that this decision was made due to his decision not to talk to NCAA investigators. “The University must declare you ineligible for intercollegiate competition,” the letter continued. “Due to your failure to cooperate, the University must also disassociate you from its athletic program for a period of five (5) years.” Sure, he won’t be able to come back to Columbus to workout at OSU’s gym in the off-season. But let’s be honest, why would Pryor ever come back to Columbus? Whether they will admit it or not, the university might as well have put a bow on that letter to Pryor, as that should be the last step for Pryor to get into the NFL. Thanks to OSU, expect Pryor to be eligible for a supplemental draft (whenever that may be). read more

Single and looking Ohio State mens tennis Blaz Rola in need of

A member of the Ohio State men’s tennis team is single and looking – for a new doubles partner, that is. Blaz Rola, a junior from Slovenia, wants to continue the streak of success he had last season into this year. The Buckeyes (8-1) entered the 2013 season coming off a record-setting 2012 campaign, when then-sophomore Rola and his then-senior doubles partner Chase Buchanan became the first tandem in collegiate men’s tennis history to capture three major national championship titles in a single season. The then-No. 1-seeded duo finished their season with a 36-4 overall record and a perfect 14-0 run in three major tournament victories – D’Novo/ITA All-American Championships, USTA/ITA National Indoor Championships and NCAA Championships. “(Blaz and Chase) were two guys who put a lot into their tennis game, and two guys who have a deep appreciation for OSU athletics. It was great to see those guys accomplish (tournament wins),” said coach Ty Tucker. Rola said the pair’s accomplishments stemmed from complementing one another’s games well. “I was more of a baseline game guy, staying in the back, and (Chase) was more with the quick hands on the net with the volleys. Our returns worked so well in doubles, and that’s what made us a great team,” Rola said. After the celebrations had died down and the trophies were placed in glass cases, the partners had to face a certain reality – Buchanan was graduating, and Rola was staying behind. Rola said that Buchanan, who graduated as one of OSU’s most decorated athletes ever, has gone on to join the United States Tennis Association professional national team in Florida. Buchanan did not provide comment despite multiple attempts to reach him. The OSU men’s tennis team has since been faced with the task of finding a new partner for Rola in the wake of the All-American talent it had in Buchanan. “To replace Chase is going to be really, really hard – almost impossible. I don’t think I can find someone that I had such a great chemistry with,” Rola said. “But I’m 100 percent sure that I can find, out of the (11) players we have, a partner that I have chemistry with.” Tucker said the team ensures its consistent play by learning a universal formation that translates to flexibility in pairing for doubles game. “We play the same doubles formation on all three courts. You’re going to lose people in college tennis to injury, and you’re going to lose people to graduation, so everyone has to be on the same page,” Tucker said. “We’ve been fortunate enough in doubles to win some points because all three courts play the same system and everyone is taught the same way.” Even as the team draws close to the middle of its season, Rola said he’s not yet found the new partner for him. “Changing partners for me at least is not such a big deal … I’ve played with (redshirt sophomore) Kevin (Metka) a couple matches, I’ve played with (redshirt sophomore) Hunter (Callahan) a couple practice sets, I’ve played with (senior) Connor Smith a couple practice sets. With everyone I’ve played with, it’s just been great … (But) I don’t have a specific partner,” Rola said. Smith, one of Rola’s doubles partners this year, said he has enjoyed helping the team out in doubles play so far. “(Chase’s) shoes are huge shoes to fill … so I’m not really trying to fill any shoes. I’m just doing my best to help out the team and get a point,” Smith said. Smith said the team aims to repeat its doubles win at the NCAA tournament this year. “(To win) is our whole goal. We go (to) a tournament to try and win it and bring something back for our season,” Smith said. Rola could not repeat his coveted three-peat from last year because he spent the fall playing tournaments in Europe. As the season continues, Tucker said he is willing to continue experimenting up until tournament time to find the right player combinations. “You’ve got to make sure that all three doubles spots have the best chance to win, and sometimes you have to split people up,” he said. The Buckeyes are set to continue tournament play on Friday at the ITA National Team Indoor Championship in Seattle, Wash. read more

Opinion Ohio State mens tennis streak deserves place among historic records

The Ohio State Varsity Tennis Center hosted a match between the Buckeyes and Oklahoma on March 6. OSU lost, 4-3. The loss broke a 200-match home winning streak for OSU. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead / Lantern photographerThere’s Wilt Chamberlain’s 100-point game and Byron Nelson’s 11-straight PGA Tour victories. Then there’s the Ohio State men’s tennis team’s 200 home victories in a row.While none of those records are likely to be broken, the first two will go down in history with much more fanfare than the third. But it could be argued that the Buckeyes’ streak, which ended Friday with a 4-3 loss to Oklahoma, is the most impressive of the bunch.In his prime, Chamberlain was the single most dominant player in basketball history. The same could be said for Nelson when it comes to golf, but neither of them would have been likely to post the same numbers against modern competition.Beyond that, Chamberlain’s ridiculous record required just 48 minutes of pure domination. Still impressive? Of course, but stack that up against Nelson.Eleven straight victories on the PGA Tour means you’ve sustained quality play for months on end, not for one measly outing. But even still, Nelson came in second seven times during the 1945 season and missed out on the top two five times.That’s getting nitpicky of course, but nitpicking is necessary when stacking a record up against that of the OSU men’s tennis program, which won every single match in Columbus for nearly 12 years.That’s right, 12 years.Not only did the Buckeyes sustain dominance for more than a decade, but they did it with three full rotations of recruiting classes.By the time the streak ended, the names that started it were ancient history.The main constant has been coach Ty Tucker, who was on hand from the beginning of the streak right up until the end, and beyond.To sustain a record for that long, to dominate in a fashion neither Chamberlain or Nelson or any other great athlete could have, is significant. And that could be felt by anyone in attendance at the Varsity Tennis Center on Friday when redshirt-senior Kevin Metka fought through match points and cramps before falling just short against Oklahoma sophomore Florin Bragusi.From the moment the doubles competition started, right around 8:30 p.m., there was tension throughout the crowd.There are two sets of stands at OSU’s indoor arena: One main permanent area with bleachers, and then a few folding chairs and another set of bleachers set up on the opposite end of courts 1-4. I sat front and center in my OSU-logoed folding chair right up until Metka’s match — being played on court 6 on the other side of the main stands — was the only one still going.I spent most of my time trying to keep track of scores and — if I’m being honest — trying to figure out exactly how the scoring worked. The tension in the crowd around me rose and fell with every point scored by either team, as spectators cheered, clapped or craned their necks trying to see the scoreboard behind them.OSU took two of the three doubles matches, earning the Buckeyes a point, before singles play began.Redshirt-sophomore Ralf Steinbach was the first Buckeye to finish his singles match, easily dispatching his opponent to put OSU ahead, 2-0.Then the Buckeyes picked up another win on court one, but their players on courts two, three and five all lost. But Metka and Bragusi were still playing, so the crowd — officially announced as an OSU indoor record of 713 — moved into the stands or stood courtside to watch Metka fight for the streak’s life.While he had chances to end it in the third set, Metka came up just short, about as close as he possibly could without winning. And with that loss, the streak was snapped. But the crowd exiting the building wasn’t angered. There was barely even disappointment.Metka and OSU had lost a match, moving their record to 12-4,  and the streak ended at 200, but the crowd on hand simply seemed to have respect for what had been accomplished already.At the end of the day, Tucker said it best: “Everybody in the world knew that the streak would end at some point.” read more

Football Damon Webb signs as undrafted free agent with Tennessee Titans

Ohio State senior safety Damon Webb (7) prepares to defend an Illinois offensive play in the second half in the game against Illinois on Nov. 18. Ohio State won 52-14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorFormer Ohio State safety Damon Webb has signed with the Tennessee Titans as an undrafted free agent, according to a tweet from Ohio State. Webb will join former Ohio State cornerbacks coach Kerry Coombs in Tennessee along with first-year head coach and former Ohio State defensive line and linebackers coach Mike Vrabel. Free Agent Alert: @DameWebb @Titans #GoBucks #DevelopedHere #TitanUp pic.twitter.com/AsB1GTl5ko— Ohio State Football (@OhioStateFB) April 28, 2018Playing in 16 games combined in 2014 and 2015, Webb became a starter in 2016; playing alongside former Ohio State safety and future first round draft pick Malik Hooker. During his junior season, Webb had 57 tackles, two tackles for loss and an interception, earning an honorable mention for All-Big Ten.With the loss of Hooker, Webb became the only remaining starter on Ohio State’s secondary moving into the 2017 season. He ended the season with 61 tackles, leading the team with five interceptions and earning third-team All-Big Ten honors.Before ending his collegiate career, Webb helped Ohio State win the Cotton Bowl over USC, recovering a fumble to set up a score and returning an interception for a touchdown, earning him the defensive Most Valuable Player award for the bowl game.At the 2018 NFL Combine, Webb ran a 4.62 40-yard dash and tied for eighth among safeties with 17 bench press reps. read more

On an island How male sexual assault victims deal with trauma

Richard Strauss in his Ohio State College of Medicine photograph. Ohio State has interviewed more than 100 former Ohio State athletes with sexual abuse claims against former team physician Richard Strauss. Credit: Courtesy of Ohio StateBrian Garrett felt sick when he saw the picture.It had been just over 20 years since he stopped working for former Ohio State University doctor and team physician Richard Strauss at his private clinic. Twenty years of suppressing the memories of what was done to him by the now-alleged sexual predator.But when Ohio State announced its investigation of the doctor, a picture of the doctor made its way to the internet. Suddenly those memories of the few days he worked at the clinic, suppressed for years, began to resurface. And he hasn’t been able to get them out of his head since.Working for Strauss as an administrative assistant at Strauss’ clinic — which Garrett said was called “Men’s Clinics of America” — in 1996, Garrett, a former nursing student at Ohio State University, said he witnessed first-hand Strauss’ sexual assault of men. During one shift, Garrett said Strauss called him into the examining room while he was with a patient. Garrett said he walked in to see the athlete with his pants down with the doctor masturbating him until orgasm. “I was standing there like, ‘What the hell am I witnessing?’” Garrett said. “I saw the guy’s face, and his face is red and embarrassed.” When the athlete left the room, Garrett said Strauss asked him if he had any issues, to which he responded he had heartburn. After laying him down, Garrett said Strauss pulled down his pants, spending five to 10 minutes trying to give him an erection. Deciding not to come back to work at the “Men’s Clinics of America” after the incident, Garrett said he was feeling alone, isolated as he struggled to comprehend what had happened. “I was on an island. I didn’t know any of the athletes. I didn’t know any of that shit that they talked about [at] Larkins Hall or anything like that. I didn’t know any of that,” Garrett said. “I thought it was just an isolated thing, like maybe there is something wrong with me. My parents always told me not to put myself in bad situations. Did I screw up?” Dr. Howard Fradkin, a physician who specializes in male sexual assault and recovery based out of Columbus, said this emotional response is common for victims. “If a man is sexually assaulted today, the most likely response he is going to think is I’m the only one,” Fradkin said. “That’s still one of the things that goes on and the next thought is, ‘It’s my fault.’” When it comes to treating cases of sexual assault, Fradkin said some things are the same no matter what gender is involved. He said the event of assault creates trauma, something he defines as the outcome of an overwhelming situation out of the victims’ control. However, he said the treatment between male and female sexual assault starts with acknowledging the difference between how men and women are socialized. “Traditional masculinity states that men are supposed to be powerful and in control, so it creates a much different dynamic in terms of talking about it and acknowledging it,” Fradkin said. “Many men who I worked with did not even consider what was done to them as sexual abuse. They would say, ‘That’s how I learned about sex. That’s how I was initiated.’ They don’t think, ‘This is something terrible that was done to me.’” Fradkin said male sexual assault victims, without the ability to hide their arousal “internalize and blame themselves” no matter the sexual orientation of that particular male. Emma Carroll, a Ph.D. student at Ohio State in gender and sexuality studies, describes male sexual assault as “de-masculating,” using the male stigma as the notion that the victims should have been able to protect themselves against such events from occurring.“I thought it was just an isolated thing, like maybe there is something wrong with me. My parents always told me not to put myself in bad situations. Did I screw up?” – Brian GarrettIn the years following, Garrett said he had not told only a few friends about his experiences with Strauss. However, even then, the concept of sexual assault, especially involving males, was not considered prevalent. “Back then you didn’t call it sexual assault,” Garrett said. “There was rape and there was everything else. Nobody called it sexual harassment, assault. I just said some dude touched me and felt me up for 10 minutes and jacked a guy off.” However, in the years following, Garrett said he had a constant level of anxiety, even after he moved on from working at Strauss’ clinic. He said he continues to want to be isolated and continues to have trust issues in every aspect of his life. Carroll describes the effects of sexual assault as similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, saying victims commonly struggle with anxiety and fear. Fradkin added that some side effects including depression and addictions, such as alcohol, drug and sex, are common in victims recovering from sexual assault. After sharing with a few friends, Garrett said he internalized the events, not sharing his experiences with anyone. He said he kept it in the back of his mind, trying to move on with his life, trying not to think about it. However, when Ohio State announced its investigation of Strauss and the alleged sexual assaults he had performed while a team physician at the university, Garrett said looking at a picture of the doctor in a news story made him feel like he needed to throw up.  “The problem is, I haven’t seen his face in 22, 23 years since it happened,” Garrett said. “Here’s the crazy part about it, as soon as I saw his face, the whole box opened up in my head and man, it hasn’t stopped since.” As multiple stories were released, showing other athletes and people allegedly victimized by Strauss, Garrett said there was a sense of validation, even if that did not change his other feelings towards what had happened.Fradkin said this problem is more widespread than people think. To put things in perspective, he would mention the ratio of men sexually assaulted and compare it to the number of fans at a football game on a given Saturday. “When I do trainings, I would put up a picture of Ohio Stadium,” Fradkin said. “I would say there are 100,000 people in this stadium and let’s say 60 percent of them are men. That’s 60,000 men sitting in the same stadium on one football Saturday. If it’s one and six, that’s 3,600 men in that stadium on one day.” Fradkin wants people to know that this is something that happens to men around the country in all aspects of life, whether as a child or as an adult. However, with help, he said healing is possible and achievable. For Garrett, he is still mad at Strauss. He said he is still mad at Ohio State, saying the events between Strauss and his alleged victims were “100 percent preventable.” However, Garrett feels like he has a role to play moving forward. He views himself as one of the main spokesman for the alleged victims of Strauss in his time as a team doctor at Ohio State and his time at Strauss’ clinic. Even though he might not be comfortable with that responsibility, Garrett said that is a sacrifice he is willing to make for the betterment of future college students around the country and the eradication of sexual assault on campus. “I want this to stop,” Garrett said. “How many universities does this have to happen to before it stops? I’ll go through the exposure of being in the public light.“I just can’t sit back and not say anything. If nobody says anything, nothing changes. My way to process it is to speak out, tell my experience and maybe others come out. If other guys don’t come out, that’s fine, but they have to go talk to others about it. It’s going to eat them up inside.” read more